The Rattan Effect

From its foundation, Rattan has that inclusive effect on its surroundings.  These vines take root on the ground but involve the support of tall trees in order to grow.  The strength of the tree enables the vine to climb towards the sunlight. Upon its harvest, it requires the cooperation of communities to cut and pull it off its tree support.  “Farming” Rattan means allowing the forest to persist.  Bringing man and nature together, it protects the forest while giving local farmers a source of living.  And as a raw material, it necessitates collaboration between craftsman and designer to fold, bend and bring out the best of imagination into reality.

However, according to the only Rattan resource inventory in the Philippines done from 1983-1987, there was a total of around 4.5M stocks.  But there has been an estimated steady decline since in the stock and biodiversity of these resources, with little conservation effort to preserve the species endemic to our country.  The loss of these species can have a huge impact to forest reserves.  In 2011, the country has already been predicted to lose its forest cover in 40 years.  The time is ripe for Rattan to take a collective stage, together with Bamboo, in the worlds’ move to combat environmental distress.

The Paris Climate Change Agreement of 2016 united 180 countries—including China and US—in an aim to reduce the rising temperature and greenhouse gases.  This means the world has decided to take the path of sustainability incorporated into its industrial and technological evolution.  It is a wide open door for Rattan and Bamboo producing countries, as zero-carbon construction materials are aimed to replace plastics, metals and timber.

Sources:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rattan
http://opinion.inquirer.net/5809/protect-philippine-forests
http://www.edgedavao.net/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=4897:rattan-is-still-big-business
http://www.fao.org/docrep/003/Y2783E/y2783e15.htm
http://www.inbar.int/sites/default/files/INBAR%20Position%20Paper%20-%20Bamboo%2C%20Rattan%20%26%20the%20SDGs_0.pdf
http://www.inbar.int/sites/default/files/INBAR%20Position%20Paper3%20-%20Paris%20Agreement%20-%20next%20steps%20for%20bamboo%20and%20rattan_0.pdf
http://www.berkeley.edu/news/students/2003/borneo/info.shtml
http://www.theverge.com/2016/9/3/12783750/paris-agreement-china-united-states-climate-change
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